Why Being Bossy Is A Blessing

Some of the most influential women in the world, including Beyoncé and Oprah, are supporting a push to outlaw the term "bossy." Lean In and the Girls Scouts support the #BanBossy initiative, which was developed to inspire girls to take the initiative.

If a woman leads, she runs the risk of being called "bossy," but if a male did the same, he would either be leading well or he would just be "the boss."

When a boy is referred to as a leader, it implies strength, achievement, and success. But what if a girl is described as "bossy"? It only conveys negative meanings, giving you the impression that the speaker is a spoiled brat.

Women with vision have been born and are now being acknowledged in a culture where equality for women is increasing everywhere. These ladies are clear about what they want, when they want it, and they won't give up until they get it.

So why don't we celebrate this self-reliance and fortitude that our parents' generation didn't see in women? We should have been by now. I've been bossy since I was around five. I have cursed myself for this quality.

I used to wonder why I couldn't just sit back and not care like every other student in the classroom after being teased by "friends" who complained about my constant need to boss everyone around.

I would act like my sister wasn't three years older than me when we played school; I would become irritable with my parents if I didn't get my way; and I would find it difficult to follow instructions from my teachers.

If I said I had broken the habit, I'd be lying. It's leadership, not bossiness, I've just learned as I've grown older and more mature.

I won't even consider the possibility that it is a "habit" because it isn't. I was born with it, just like many other young girls, and I've developed it along with the rest of my personality.

My tendency to be a leader doesn't prevent me from being a team player or indicate that I lack the social graces to follow others' lead. However, I won't take it from anyone who claims that somehow women are less qualified to hold leadership positions.

However, I won't take it from anyone who claims that somehow women are less qualified to hold leadership positions. I've been called "intimidating," among other cold-hearted comments said out of resentment and jealousy, not just by men but also by women, because I typically know exactly what I want.

I've been called "intimidating," among other cold-hearted comments said out of resentment and jealousy, not just by men but also by women, because I typically know exactly what I want.

Not the club girl who, if appearances could kill, would have you dead on the floor because you're wearing the same outfit as her, but just me, who has done nothing but work tirelessly and with enthusiasm, has been dubbed "intimidating."

I don't have a single hateful bone in my body (well, maybe one does, but honestly, who doesn't? ), yet some people with no ambition, drive, or vision can only try to drag you down. College if it's not high school. If college isn't an option, there's always working.

Like the man in the boardroom who is interviewing for a six-figure pay position; yet, because the applicant is both a woman and more competent than he is, he will already have discovered five flaws in her before she even enters the workplace.

Bossy women work hard to accomplish their goals and succeed. Like me, they find it difficult to delegate tasks to others for fear that they won't complete them. But as you can see, the key is to learn to put your faith in other people's abilities as well as your own.

In a similar vein, it's time for men everywhere (not all, but the majority) to realise that occasionally a so-called "bossy" woman is simply demonstrating her leadership abilities.

I've learned that I'm not bossy; rather, I'm driven. I am responsible for my actions, my decisions, my errors, and, most importantly, my happiness.

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